Idiom:  take a leaf out of someone’s book

Meaning 

Idiom:  take a leaf out of someone’s book

  • to copy with someone else has done


Example sentences

  • I should take a leaf out of your book and lose 25 pounds.
  • Take a leaf out of my book and get up an hour early to write and you’ll finish writing a book in a year.
  • I took a leaf out of my roommate's book and learned how to cook.
  • Why don't you take a leaf out of your brother's book and do your chores without having to be reminded?
  • Take a leaf out of my book and make your own coffee at home and you'll save so much money.
  • My son took a leaf out of his father's book and grew a thick beard.
  • We hope our daughter will take a leaf out of her sister's book and go into medicine.
  • We're hoping my neighbor will take a leaf out of our book and apply weed killer to their lawn.
  • My dad took a leaf out of my mom's book and called in sick to work so we could go to the beach.
  • If you want to be a professional tennis player take a leaf out of Roger Federer's book and get serious about your diet and fitness.

Synonyms

  • take your cue from someone
  • follow in someone's footsteps
  • model yourself on someone


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