9 English Spring idioms 

These nine spring idioms are all very common in English. In spring, flowers and leaves suddenly burst open, often in vibrant colors.  This type of quick and unexpected movement is reflected in many of these spring idiom examples.

Remember, idioms are expressions for a group of words together. The entire group of words all together have a fixed or set meaning that is different than if you looked up the words separately in the dictionary.


9 spring idioms with examples

More sentence examples

It can be very helpful to read several example sentences when you learn a new idiom. Below, you'll find more examples for each idiom from the info-graphic:


spring into action:  to suddenly start doing something.

  • Watch my kids spring into action  to the do their homework as soon as they hear their father's car pull into the garage.
  • I'd already sprung into action  to do CPR before the emergency medics arrived in the ambulance.


spring fever:  a feeling of restlessness after a long, cold winter and there is excitement for the new season.

  • I really have spring fever  this year and cannot wait until it's nice enough outside to take the boat out on the lake.   
  • When I became a professor I was surprised to see that even graduate students get spring fever  and stop coming to class as the weather warms up.


a spring in one's step:  a cheerful attitude, positive mood and enthusiasm (which can be seen in the way you have a little bounce as you take steps while walking).

  • She's had a spring in her step  ever since she got a boyfriend.
  • Getting straight A's in school will certainly put a spring in your step.
  • When you walk into the interview put a little spring in your step  so the panel will think you are confident and enthusiastic about the job.


spring to mind:  to suddenly think of something.

  • When I think of the 80s, big hair, the Rubick's cube, Atari, shoulder pads and Duran Duran  spring to mind.
  • "Hot dogs for breakfast?"  "Sorry, honey, it was the firs thing that sprang to mind."
  • The psychiatrist asked me what springs to mind when I get angry with my wife.


spring to life:  to suddenly start doing something or to become more alive.

  • All my coworkers spring to life  whenever the owner visits the factory.
  • Our dog sleeps all day except when the mailman comes and then he springs to life,  ready to bark and attack.


spring something on someone:  to surprise someone (or trick someone).

  • Do you really think it's wise to spring your wedding proposal on her  at work in front of all of her colleagues?
  • It's not fair that my boss always springs her work on me  so she can leave early.


spring to someone's defense:  to immediately defend someone from verbal or physical attack.

  • When the thief grabbed my purse another passenger on the bus sprang to my defense  and tackled him at the door before he could escape.
  • I just sat there trying to explain the figures to the client until finally my boss arrived and sprang to my defense.


spring to one's feet:  to quickly stand up.

  • I was sleeping when the national anthem started so my girlfriend kicked my leg and I sprang to my feet. 
  • When they asked for volunteers to get a makeover, I sprang to my feet  and yelled to try to get their attention first.


spring back:  to quickly recover from something.

  • Don't worry, you're 22 years old. Your figure will spring back  after you have the baby.
  • I though I'd spring back  after the operation but there have been a lot of complications and I will not be able to return to work for another 6-8 weeks.

Your turn

The best way to learn new vocabulary is to use it in your own practice sentences. Pick an idiom (or two) from above and write your own sample sentences.


> > Spring Idioms

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